Browse Items (60 total)

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The Psychedelic Maze Game was based on a patent Weisbecker filed in 1966 for a device which, according to the patent, would “instruct in the elements of binary logic and computer operation.”[1] Players would use a stylus to move through the maze,…

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In this one-person card game, four cards are printed on both sides with a pattern, and each card has a triangular cut-out. This allows the cards to be stacked so that various parts of some cards are visible through the cut-out portions of other…

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The FRED (Flexible Recreational and Educational Device) system, based on the 1802 microprocessor, formed the basis for RCA’s foray into the personal computer market. Weisbecker and his team built several prototypes of this early computer, including…

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Joseph Weisbecker's personal notebook, where he recorded, among other things, his game ideas.

S.226.81 Psychedelic no. 9 instructions.pdf
Psychedelic no. 9 was a puzzle game for two players with two individual game boards and nine puzzle pieces. Each player chooses any puzzle piece from among the nine and places it on her game board. The first player to get three puzzle pieces to…

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Not all of Weisbecker's games had a computer angle. The Pollution Game was simply a tabletop board game themed around environmental concerns. No gameplay instructions survive of this game, but a photograph from the Hagley Library shows that there was…

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A number puzzle game, World's Smallest Giant Brain is a wood and plastic apparatus similar to a tally counter, but with two buttons instead of one to advance the numbers. It was played between a human (the first lever on the device) and the…

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Frustrated by the lackluster response from game companies, in the late 1960s Weisbecker decided to strike out on his own.  He created a line of puzzle books that he sold by mail order through Komputer Pastimes, a company he founded himself. In 1977,…

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The COSMAC 180A was another prototype meant to demonstrate the 180 microprocessor architecture. It never went into production, and was used only in the lab.

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Bits & Spaces was, according to its instruction manual, was “based on the flip-flop principle used in modern digital computers.”[1] The game had a dozen playing pieces (called bits), and two playing boards with pairs of spaces connected by…

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Bugs and Looops: The Computer Game introduced the concept of programing to its players, who used the game to program a simple Turing Machine. It is a kit that contains all of the pieces necessary to play six different games, including a more complex…

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Blue plastic Think-a-Dot type game, made in Hong Kong.

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The Think-a-Dot, produced by E.S.R., Inc. in early 1966 and based on a game concept by Joseph Weisbecker, is a computer-based puzzle theory toy that demonstrated automata theory. It is a plastic toy with three holes on top through which a ball is…

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The game that would become the Think-a-Dot started out as a concept called Magic Marbles in one of Weisbecker’s personal notebooks from 1963.[1] From there, he changed the game’s name to Magic Spots, a game that promised fun for “preschoolers, PhDs,…

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Debug is a number pattern puzzle where players moved a series of ‘bugs’ down a playing board. Each player chooses her starting color: pink or green. Eight ‘bugs’ are then placed on the playing board covering some of the numbers on the playing board,…
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