Browse Items (7 total)

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The Psychedelic Maze Game was based on a patent Weisbecker filed in 1966 for a device which, according to the patent, would “instruct in the elements of binary logic and computer operation.”[1] Players would use a stylus to move through the maze,…

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The FRED (Flexible Recreational and Educational Device) system, based on the 1802 microprocessor, formed the basis for RCA’s foray into the personal computer market. Weisbecker and his team built several prototypes of this early computer, including…

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Not all of Weisbecker's games had a computer angle. The Pollution Game was simply a tabletop board game themed around environmental concerns. No gameplay instructions survive of this game, but a photograph from the Hagley Library shows that there was…

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Frustrated by the lackluster response from game companies, in the late 1960s Weisbecker decided to strike out on his own.  He created a line of puzzle books that he sold by mail order through Komputer Pastimes, a company he founded himself. In 1977,…

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The Think-a-Dot, produced by E.S.R., Inc. in early 1966 and based on a game concept by Joseph Weisbecker, is a computer-based puzzle theory toy that demonstrated automata theory. It is a plastic toy with three holes on top through which a ball is…

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The game that would become the Think-a-Dot started out as a concept called Magic Marbles in one of Weisbecker’s personal notebooks from 1963.[1] From there, he changed the game’s name to Magic Spots, a game that promised fun for “preschoolers, PhDs,…

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Debug is a number pattern puzzle where players moved a series of ‘bugs’ down a playing board. Each player chooses her starting color: pink or green. Eight ‘bugs’ are then placed on the playing board covering some of the numbers on the playing board,…
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